Langston Hughes: The Collected Poems of Langston Hughes 

“The ultimate book for both the dabbler and serious scholar–. [Hughes] is sumptuous and sharp, playful and sparse, grounded in an earthy music–. This book is a glorious revelation.”–Boston Globe

Spanning five decades and comprising 868 poems (nearly 300 of which have never before appeared in book form), this magnificent volume is the definitive sampling of a writer who has been called the poet laureate of African America–and perhaps our greatest popular poet since Walt Whitman. Here, for the first time, are all the poems that Langston Hughes published during his lifetime, arranged in the general order in which he wrote them and annotated by Arnold Rampersad and David Roessel.
Alongside such famous works as “The Negro Speaks of Rivers” and Montage of a Dream Deferred,The Collected Poemsincludes the author’s lesser-known verse for children; topical poems distributed through the Associated Negro Press; and poems such as “Goodbye Christ” that were once suppressed. Lyrical and pungent, passionate and polemical, the result is a treasure of a book, the essential collection of a poet whose words have entered our common language.

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Additional Resources:

Langston Hughes Speaking at UCLA, 1967 (video)
Meet the Past: Langston Hughes at the Kansas Public Library (video)

The Negro in American Culture: Group Discussion with Baldwin, Hughes, Hansberry, Capouya and Kazin (video)
Academy of Poets: Langston Hughes (website)

Achille Mbembe: Critique of Black Reason 

In Critique of Black Reason eminent critic Achille Mbembe offers a capacious genealogy of the category of Blackness—from the Atlantic slave trade to the present—to critically reevaluate history, racism, and the future of humanity. Mbembe teases out the intellectual consequences of the reality that Europe is no longer the world’s center of gravity while mapping the relations among colonialism, slavery, and contemporary financial and extractive capital. Tracing the conjunction of Blackness with the biological fiction of race, he theorizes Black reason as the collection of discourses and practices that equated Blackness with the nonhuman in order to uphold forms of oppression. Mbembe powerfully argues that this equation of Blackness with the nonhuman will serve as the template for all new forms of exclusion. With Critique of Black Reason, Mbembe offers nothing less than a map of the world as it has been constituted through colonialism and racial thinking while providing the first glimpses of a more just future. 

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28 Page Excerpt (PDF)
Reviews: 

Theory Culture & Society
Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education and Society
Further Writings by the Author:

Necropolitics (PDF)
Provisional Notes on the Post Colony (PDF)
Decolonizing Knowledge and the Question of the Archive (PDF)
African Modes of Self Writing (PDF)

Additional Resources:

Panel: Critique of Black Reason: Achille Mbembe, Laurent Dubois and Tsitsi Jaji
Lecture: Politics of Viscerality (video)
Lecture: Technologies of Happiness in the Age of Animism (video)
Lecture: Democracy in the Age of Dynamism (video)
Lecture: Raceless Future

Claudia Rankine: Citizen: An American Lyric

Claudia Rankine’s bold new book recounts mounting racial aggressions in ongoing encounters in twenty-first-century daily life and in the media. Some of these encounters are slights, seemingly slips of the tongue, and some are intentional offensives in the classroom, at the supermarket, at home, on the tennis court with Serena Williams and the soccer field with Zinedine Zidane, online, on TV—everywhere, all the time. The accumulative stresses come to bear on a person’s ability to speak, perform, and stay alive. Our addressability is tied to the state of our belonging, Rankine argues, as are our assumptions and expectations of citizenship. In essay, image, and poetry, Citizen is a powerful testament to the individual and collective effects of racism in our contemporary, often named “post-race” society.

Resources (Use in the Classroom)
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