Terrence McKenna: Food of the Gods: The Search for the Original Tree of Knowledge: A Radical History of Plants, Dugs and Human Revolution 

“I came across food of the gods randomly when I was living in East Texas and 10 years ago. I was learning how to farm and wanted to know more about mycology and stumbled upon the weird and wonderful McKenna who writes exactly the way he speaks. I say so in case there are people out there who would prefer listening over reading. All of his talks are archived on The Psychedelic Salon. The host Lorenzo who is a bit annoying use to be hardcore right and switched teams after an experience.” 

Caroline Wells Chandler 

The ethnobotanist co-author of Psilocybin: The Magic Mushroom Grower’s Guide (not reviewed) puts forth the theory that magic mushrooms are the original “tree of knowledge” and that the general lack of psychedelic exploration is leading Western society toward eventual collapse or destruction–controversial statements, to say the least, though the argument’s details often prove fascinating. In the beginning, McKenna tells us, there were protohumans with small brains and plenty of genetic competition, and what eventually separated the men from the apes was an enthusiasm for the hallucinogenic mushrooms that grew on the feces of local cattle. Claiming that psilocybin in the hominid diet would have enhanced eyesight, sexual enjoyment, and language ability and would have thereby placed the mushroom-eaters in the front lines of genetic evolution–eventually leading to hallucinogen-ingesting shamanistic societies, the ancient Minoan culture, and some Amazonian tribes today–McKenna also asserts that the same drugs are now outlawed in the US because of their corrosive effect on our male-dominated, antispiritual society. Unconsciously craving the vehicles by which our ancestors expanded their imaginations and found meaning in their lives, he says, we feast on feeble substitutes: coffee, sugar, and chocolate, which reinforce competition and aggressiveness; tobacco, which destroys our bodies; alcohol, whose abuse leads to male violence and female degradation; TV, which deadens our senses; and the synthetics–heroin, cocaine and their variations–which leave us victimized by our own addiction. On the other hand, argues McKenna, magic mushrooms, used in a spiritually enlightened, ritual manner, can open the door to greater consciousness and further the course of human evolution- -legalization of all drugs therefore is, he says, an urgent necessity. 

Kirkus Reviews
On Amazon

Find at your Local Library

PDF
Further Writings by the Author: 

The Archaic Revival (PDF)

True Hallucinations (PDF)

Lecture Transcript: The Importance of Human Beings (text)

Lecture Transcript: Culture and Ideology are Not Your Friends (text)
Additional Resources: 

We Don’t Know Enough About the Universe to Have Anxiety (audio)

Final Earthbound Interview (video)

The Future of Humanity: McKenna, Sheldrake, Abraham (video)

Psychedelics Before and After History (video)  

Carl Jung: Man and his Symbols


This one book stands apart from Jung's other works. Before, Jungian theories were out of the reach of the general public, but then he had a dream that he, "was standing in a public place addressing a multitude of people…in rapt attention…who understood him." He was then approached by a publisher for such a book, and he agreed to take on the project with the help of a few of his closest peers. Man and his Symbols is Jung's final works, written close to the end of his life. Completed ten days before his death, it acts as a summary and reflection on his life's work.
Only the first chapter is written by Jung, and the remaining chapters are written by individuals handpicked and trained in Jungian psychology. Jung supervised and edited all of the remaining chapters. The result is a delightfully readable volume that delivers Jung's essential theories in a nutshell
Safa Alai (edited)

On Amazon
Find at your Local Library
PDF

Further Readings:
Memories, Dreams and Reflections (PDF)
The Undiscovered Self (PDF)
Psychology of the Unconscious (Ebook)
Collected Works (Ebook)